IRISES

Extensive research has been conducted on automated forms of iris-recognition. However, there has been no work investigating the ability of humans to discriminate or match irises. We envision our iris stimuli could be used to test human ability for discriminating or matching human irises.  Further, infra-red iris scans can reveal more detail than standard flash photography.

FIB-R Forensic Informatics Biometric Repository Colour Iris

What did we collect?

We collected four color photographs of the participant’s irises, two with a bounced flash (bounced off the wall behind the camera), and two with a direct flash (with the flash facing forwards). For each photo, the focus point is on the participant’s lacrimal caruncle (the pink fleshy part in the corner of the eye).

FIB-R Forensic Informatics Biometric Repository Iris Infra-red Right

A number of images were also taken using an infra-red iris scanner to capture infra-red images of the participants’ irises.

FIB-R Forensic Informatics Biometric Repository Iris Infra-red Right

How did we collect it?

In order to collect color iris photos we equipped the face camera with the 18-55mm zoom lens and change the zoom to 55mm. Participants were then instructed to stand roughly half a metre away from the camera and to look straight down the lens. From this distance, and with the zoom at 55mm, approximately 50% of the participants face is visible on the live preview.

We used an infra-red iris scanner to capture infra-red images of participants’ irises. Participants were instructed to look through the scanner and to hold it about 20cm from their face. Then they press the button on top to turn the camera on. Participants are then asked to slowly move the scanner towards their irises and are given verbal direction to make sure images are in focus.

After a couple practice trials, participants should be giving good-quality iris scans. The entire process usually yields approximately 5-6 scans of each eye.